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Photo by Lisa Kereszi

 

LAS RUBIAS DEL NORTE was started seven years ago, when Allyssa Lamb and Emily Hurst decided to quit their classical choir and start a group of their own. The group’s sound quickly veered off its classical course, incorporating Boleros, Peruvian waltzes, Andean huaynos and Cuban Guajiras as well as songs drawn from repertoires as diverse as opera, Yéyé, Rebetika and Bollywood. The result played like a dreamy soundtrack with classical harmonies set to a Latin beat.

Read more on Las Rubias del Norte website

 

NEW ALBUM ZIGUALA IN STORES MARCH 9TH. CD RELEASE SHOW AT JOE'S PUB MARCH 12TH

 

WHAT THE PRESS SAYS:

- Las Rubias on NPR's Weekend Edition

- Allyssa Lamb on Studio 360

"... elegant, finely wrought Latin-influenced songs." "Las Rubias del Norte compress big-band compositions into sparkling gems."
The New Yorker

"A pair of angelic voices pushes this elegant, Latin-flavored band's swoon rating into the stratosphere." Time Out New York

"Before you say rumba wasn't meant to be this civilized, study danzón ("Perfidia," "Amorosa Guajira") "Sounds surpassingly pretty."
Robert Christgau

"Harmonies as pure as the Andean air"
LA Times

There’s no quizas about it—despite their roots (both hair and ethnic)—these rubias are the real thing." New York Press

ZIGUALA. After a two year hiatus, the Blondes are back. The new album includes a Neapolitan ballad, a Bollywood classic, a Kurt Weill song in French and a greek tune. Las Rubias do keep the Pan-Latin spirit alive by treating it all like it was recorded in Veracruz in 1962
Click here for more information.

PANAMERICANA: draws its inspiration from all across the Americas, and plays like a dreamy soundtrack where cha-cha and boleros mix with classical harmonies and cowboy music. The result is a collection of 13 songs, each of which a "sparkling gem” (The New Yorker.) Click here for more information. panamericana
   
Rumba Internationale: On their debut eight track CD, las Rubias look back to the Latin motherland most of them never had. They mix boleros, cha cha cha’s and Guajiras as well as a selection from the Mozart requiem – making it all sound like it belongs on Cuban radio. Click here for more information. rhumba